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Interviewer (translation): Martin Gore, my first question will be a global question about the existence of a group like Depeche Mode in 1985. Nowadays every group uses electronic in their music. So isn't it difficult to find an identity within a typical electronic group in 1985?
Interviewer (translation): Martin Gore, my first question will be a global question about the existence of a group like Depeche Mode in 1985. Nowadays every group uses electronic in their music. So isn't it difficult to find an identity within a typical electronic group in 1985?


Martin Gore: I think the difference between Depeche Mode and most of the bands, especially Duran Duran and Thompson Twins and a lot of bands in that ilk, is that we are virtually a 100% electronic band. Whereas the bands such as the Thompson Twins and Duran Duran and many other bands are basically rock bands that maybe have one synthesizer or something in their line-up. And our whole way of making music is totally different. We make music electronically: hardly anything is actually hand-played, we use a lot of computers, and we have been known to use a guitar here and there when the sound will fit, but basically that is all we use. I think, although we sample a lot of sounds, you do come to a stage where it becomes difficult to think of new ideas, but I don't think it's very difficult to find your own identity because you find yourself creating a lot of interesting sounds, far more than any conventional band would have, that you can use again. Like, there's one sound for instance, which we call a "hank", which is actually a guitar string plucked with a coin, and it's a very interesting sound. We've used that on about, I would say, 4 different tracks, because we really liked the sound, and we find it interesting. And that, in a way, gives us an identity, because they're sounds that people relate to us.
Martin Gore: I think the difference between Depeche Mode and most of the bands, especially Duran Duran and Thompson Twins and a lot of bands in that ilk, is that we are virtually a 100% electronic band, whereas the bands such as the Thompson Twins and Duran Duran and many other bands are basically rock bands that maybe have one synthesizer or something in their line-up. And our whole way of making music is totally different. We make music electronically: hardly anything is actually hand-played, we use a lot of computers, and we have been known to use a guitar here and there when the sound will fit, but basically that is all we use. I think, although we sample a lot of sounds, you do come to a stage where it becomes difficult to think of new ideas, but I don't think it's very difficult to find your own identity because you find yourself creating a lot of interesting sounds, far more than any conventional band would have, that you can use again. Like, there's one sound for instance, which we call a "hank", which is actually a guitar string plucked with a coin, and it's a very interesting sound. We've used that on about, I would say, 4 different tracks, because we really liked the sound, and we find it interesting. And that, in a way, gives us an identity, because they're sounds that people relate to us.


Interviewer: ''Dans Depeche Mode, tous les membres du group sont "claviériste", mais en studio chaquelles utiles un rôle particulier? Je pense par example à la programmation des boites à rique, ou la programmation de Fairlight?''
Interviewer: ''Dans Depeche Mode, tous les membres du group sont "claviériste", mais en studio chaquelles utiles un rôle particulier? Je pense par example à la programmation des boites à rique, ou la programmation de Fairlight?''
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Interviewer (translation): In Depeche Mode, all members are a "keyboardist",  but in the studio, who has a particular role? I'm talking about programming the digital instruments or the programming of the Fairlight...?
Interviewer (translation): In Depeche Mode, all members are a "keyboardist",  but in the studio, who has a particular role? I'm talking about programming the digital instruments or the programming of the Fairlight...?


Martin Gore: Although there are 3 keyboard players in the band, we all have got different roles, really. Mine and Alan's overlap a bit, because we're the more musical [ones]. We handle the musical side more. Whereas Andy doesn't really play a musical role in the studio. He more of, like, an ideas man, he might come up with a few ideas. But when it actually comes to programming or playing any parts, he would leave it to us. And Alan is more of a keyboard player than I am, and I probably do slightly more programming than Alan does. But yeah, sometimes the roles do overlap slightly.
Martin Gore: Although there are 3 keyboard players in the band, we all have got different roles, really. Mine and Alan's overlap a bit, because we're the more musical [ones]. We handle the musical side more, whereas Andy doesn't really play a musical role in the studio. He more of, like, an 'ideas' man, he might come up with a few ideas. But when it actually comes to programming or playing any parts, he would leave it to us. And Alan is more of a keyboard player than I am, and I probably do slightly more programming than Alan does. But yeah, sometimes the roles do overlap slightly.


Interviewer: ''Pour reparler de l'identité du group electronique, vous ne reimagez utilisé l'ultime cliché eletronique, le vocoder. C'est un parti pri que vous avez utopie d'ils ou pas?''
Interviewer: ''Pour reparler de l'identité du group electronique, vous ne reimagez utilisé l'ultime cliché eletronique, le vocoder. C'est un parti pri que vous avez utopie d'ils ou pas?''

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