List of Recoil sample sources by album

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This article is about the various sample sources used on Recoil songs and official remixes. For sample sources used on Depeche Mode works, see Depeche Mode sample sources. For sample sources used on Martin Gore works, see List of Martin Gore sample sources by album. For sample sources in the live arrangements of Depeche Mode songs as they were performed on the various concert tours undertaken by the group, see List of Depeche Mode live sample sources by tour.

In audio production, sampling refers to the use of a portion (or sample) from a sound within another recording. During Alan Wilder's tenure with the group, Depeche Mode were among the most prolific acts to make use of sampling technology within a traditional pop music format. Following his departure from Depeche Mode in 1995, Wilder would continue to employ sampling as a means to enhance the atmosphere of his music through the Recoil project, including passages of contemporary music, film soundtracks, sample library audio, and samples from his past work with Depeche Mode. The analysis of these sample sources and how they are manipulated is a popular topic of discussion amongst fans of both groups.

Glossary
Terms used in this article

Information

Key
Official
The sample is confirmed to have been used in the specified song by a past/present member of Depeche Mode, an individual involved in its production, or band archivist Daniel "BRAT" Barassi.
Confirmed
The sample is independently confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Likely
The sample is likely to have been used in the specified song but has not yet been confirmed.
Unconfirmed
The sample is not yet confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Disproven
The sample is confirmed to not have been used in the specified song.
Unknown
It is unclear if the sample was used in the specified song.

This page aims to document all verifiable sound sources for many of the musical parts utilised by Alan Wilder for the Recoil music project in the production of its studio albums, official remixes, live performances, and other works.

Due to the manipulated nature of the samples described in this article, there is unavoidable potential for error or sample misattribution. To ensure accuracy, this article strives to use verified quotes from band members and recording personnel with citations wherever possible, audio examples, and independent research voluntarily contributed by Depeche Mode and Recoil fans across the world. This article serves to provide an interesting document on this topic in a tabular format that is organized, well-researched, and reasonably accurate. Please bear in mind that due to the limited number of relevant quotes for each sample from band members or associates involved in the production of the music described on this page, audio samples that lack official confirmation are not guaranteed to be accurate.

This article differentiates samples by their origin: Self-made samples, which describes any material originally recorded by Depeche Mode or Alan Wilder for the Recoil music project, and Sourced samples, which describe samples which were not originally recorded by either group. In addition to confirmed samples, this article also covers samples that are commonly misreported as having been used but have been directly refuted by a member or associate of Depeche Mode or Recoil.

As ever, if you notice an error, wish to contribute or request the removal of information contained within this article, please feel free to contact us.

Studio albums

1 + 2 (1986)

1. "1"

"1" - Recoil
1986
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Synthesizer, drum elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "1" is derived from the opening moments of Depeche Mode's 1981 remix "Any Second Now (Altered)".
Drum elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "1" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1982 "The Sun & The Rainfall".
Synthesizer, vocal elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "1" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1982 "Shouldn't Have Done That".
Synthesizer, vocal elements A series of manipulated samples of audio separately playing forwards and in reverse audible throughout "1" are derived from Depeche Mode's 1984 single "Blasphemous Rumours".
Drum elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout the latter half of "1" is derived from the intro section of Depeche Mode's 1982 "Monument".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "1" is derived from the intro section of Depeche Mode's 1984 "If You Want".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout the latter half of "1" is derived from the intro section of Depeche Mode's 1982 remix "Oberkorn (It's A Small Town) (Development Mix)".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout the latter half of "1" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1982 single "Leave In Silence".

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Drum elements Hard Corps - Je Suis Passée - "Je Suis Passée" 1985
Confirmed
A manipulated sample of audio derived from the intro section of Hard Corps's 1985 single "Je Suis Passée" is utilised throughout "1".
Drum, synthesizer elements Kraftwerk - "Home Computer" ("Heimcomputer") - 1981
Confirmed
A brief section of an electronic drum sequence looping throughout the latter half of "1" is derived from Kraftwerk's "Home Computer". Notably, the same sample would see later use throughout Depeche Mode's 1986 "New Dress". Additionally, a separate sample of audio from "Home Computer" would see later use a percussive element throughout Depeche Mode's 1990 single "World In My Eyes".
Bass guitar elements Emulator II factory library disk #30: Funk Rock Bass - Preset #2: "Slap Bass 1"
Confirmed
A series of slap bass guitar samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #30 "Funk Rock Bass" are utilised throughout "1".
Choir elements Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices"
Confirmed
"1" utilises a series of choir samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices".

2. "2"

"2" - Recoil
1986
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Vocal elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "2" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1983 "Pipeline".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "2" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1984 single "Blasphemous Rumours".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "2" is derived from the intro section of Depeche Mode's 1982 remix "Oberkorn (It's A Small Town) (Development Mix)".
Synthesizer, vocal elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "2" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1985 single "Shake The Disease".

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Synthesizer elements Duet Emmo - Or So It Seems - "Or So It Seems" 1983
Official
A manipulated sample of audio derived from Duet Emmo 1983 "Or So It Seems" is utilised throughout "2".

Drum, bass drum elements Hard Corps - Je Suis Passée - "Je Suis Passée" 1985
Confirmed
A manipulated sample of audio derived from the intro section of Hard Corps's 1985 single "Je Suis Passée" is utilised throughout "2".
Drum, synthesizer elements Kraftwerk - "Home Computer" ("Heimcomputer") - 1981
Confirmed
A brief section of an electronic drum sequence looping throughout "2" is derived from Kraftwerk's "Home Computer". Notably, the same sample would see later use throughout Depeche Mode's 1986 "New Dress". Additionally, a separate sample of audio from "Home Computer" would see later use a percussive element throughout Depeche Mode's 1990 single "World In My Eyes".
Choir elements Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices"
Confirmed
"2" utilises a series of choir samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices".
Choir elements Emulator II factory library disk #33: Voices #2"
Confirmed
"2" utilises a series of choir samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #33 "Voices #2".
Bass elements Emulator II factory library disk #06: "Bass, Synth, Drums"
Confirmed
"2" utilises a bass guitar sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #06 "Bass, Synth, Drums".
Ambient, wind chime elements Emulator II OMI Universe of Sounds Volume 1 - "WIND CHIMES" - SAMPLE 1
Confirmed
A manipulated sample derived from the Emulator II OMI Universe of Sounds Volume 1 voice "WIND CHIMES" is utilised sporadically throughout "2".
N/A Depeche Mode – "The Great Outdoors" - 1983
Unconfirmed
N/A Depeche Mode – "Tora! Tora! Tora!" - 1981
Unconfirmed
N/A Kraftwerk – "Radioaktivität" - 1975
Unconfirmed
N/A Kraftwerk – "Uran" - 1975
Unconfirmed

Hydrology (1988)

1. "Grain"

"Grain" - Recoil
1988
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Bell-like outro "ping" In May 2020, fan "DMK" kindly provided DM Live Wiki with documentation for a series of Emulator II floppy disks that accompanied a collection of restored studio equipment used by Music For The Masses producer Dave Bascombe during the production of music albums for artists other than Depeche Mode in the mid to late eighties. One floppy disk, labeled "Wineglass (106)", features an untitled preset ("NULL PRESET"), which contains a bell-like sample, presumably the sound of a wine glass being tapped. This sample is played sporadically throughout the orchestral outro of "Grain". Notably, this sound is also used in "Strangelove", "Never Let Me Down Again", "Behind The Wheel", and "Route 66".

2. "Stone"

"Stone" - Recoil
1988
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Vocal elements A manipulated sample of audio featuring sampled and live vocals (performed by Martin Gore) utilised throughout Recoil's "Stone" is derived from the opening moments of "Fpmip", a 1987 remix of Depeche Mode's "Pimpf". Notably, aspects of this sample would see further use with Recoil's "Freeze" and "Faith Healer".

Click to display/hide audio example

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
French vocal sample French train announcer, unidentified source
Official
Wilder confirmed in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil website that "Stone" employs a vocal sample of a French train station announcer, but is unsure of its origin.[1] The announcer says: "Attention! Attention! Quai n°5, départ imminent du Nord-Express à destination de Moscou [...]"
Woodwind instrumentation Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, Jacques M'bilo - Musique centrafricaine - "Musique de chasse Babinga" - 1962
Confirmed
A section of audio derived from "Musique de chasse Babinga" as recorded by Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, and Jacques M'bilo for the 1962 Ocora release Musique centrafricaine is briefly utilised in the outro of "Stone".

3. "The Sermon"

"The Sermon" - Recoil
1988
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Polish vocal sample A vocal sample from a Polish radio broadcast reporting on Pope John Paul II's 9 June 1987 sermon in Warsaw can be heard in the introduction of "The Sermon". Wilder commented on the origin of this sample in a 2008 interview for komarnicki.pl: "I put the microphone on the shortwave radio, I tried to catch some climatic samples and that was the first thing that happened. I had no idea what they were saying! I liked the sound but it wasn't meant to be an integral part of the track, just atmosphere."[2] The two audio samples state:

[...] radcy nuncjatury w Lizbonie, którego Ojciec Święty mianował Pronuncjuszem Apostolskim w Tajla[-ndii...]

[...] wzgórze wypełniło się młodzieżą maturalną… oprócz indywidualnych [inaudible] grup kraj przebyły też dwie pielgrzymki diecezjalne. Pierwsza z Archidiecezji Warszawskiej w liczbie około 8 tysięcy młodzieży [...][3]

English Google translation:

[...] counselor of the nunciature in Lisbon, whom the Holy Father appointed as Apostolic Pronunciator in Tajla [Thailand]...

[...] the hill was filled with high school graduates ... in addition to individual freelance groups, two diocesan pilgrimages arrived in Prague. The first one, from the Archdiocese of Warsaw, was eight thousand young people strong, and they...

Bass guitar elements In May 2020, fan "DMK" kindly provided DM Live Wiki with documentation for a series of Emulator II floppy disks that accompanied a collection of restored studio equipment used by Music For The Masses co-producer Dave Bascombe during the production of music albums for artists other than Depeche Mode in the mid to late 1980s. One floppy disk, labeled "Bright Bass-GTR", features a preset titled "bright bass" that is comprised of two bass guitar samples which are used throughout "The Sermon" starting from approximately the five minute thirty-second mark. Notably, these bass guitar parts are also used during the chorus sections of the album version and throughout the single version of "Strangelove".
Synthesizer elements A manipulated sample of audio utilised throughout "The Sermon" is derived from Depeche Mode's 1984 single "Blasphemous Rumours".

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Vocal, chanting elements Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, Jacques M'bilo - Musique centrafricaine - "Chant Dakpa pour l'Abbatage d'un arbre" - 1962
Confirmed
A section of audio derived from "Chant Dakpa pour l'Abbatage d'un arbre" as recorded by Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, and Jacques M'bilo for the 1962 Ocora release Musique centrafricaine is utilised throughout the outro of "The Sermon".

Click to display/hide audio example

Woodwind, ethnic elements Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, Jacques M'bilo - Musique centrafricaine - "Musique de chasse Babinga" - 1962
Confirmed
A section of audio derived from "Musique de chasse Babinga" as recorded by Charles Duvelle, Jean-Pierre Martin, and Jacques M'bilo for the 1962 Ocora release Musique centrafricaine is utilised throughout the outro of "The Sermon".
Snare drum elements Michael Siegel - The Sounds Of The Office - "Postage Meter And Enveloppe Sealer" - 1964
Confirmed
A mechanical sound derived from "Postage Meter And Enveloppe Sealer" as featured on the 1964 Folksways Records field recording album The Sounds Of The Office.
Snare drum elements Wire - Snakedrill - "A Serious of Snakes" - November 1986
Confirmed
A manipulated snare drum sound derived from the intro of "A Serious of Snakes" by Wire is utilised throughout "The Sermon".[footnotes 1]
Synthesizer elements Emulator II factory library disk #37: Electric Guitar - Preset #3: "LoopedGuitar", SAMPLE 5, SAMPLE 9
Confirmed
Two muted harmonic guitar pluck samples derived from the Emulator II factory library disk #37 "Electric Guitar" are individually looped with a tight loop point and layered together to form the "buzzy" monophonic synth drone audible throughout "The Sermon".

Bloodline (1992)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/Bloodline

Unsound Methods (1997)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/Unsound Methods

Liquid (2000)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/Liquid

SubHuman (2007)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/SubHuman

Concert films

A Strange Hour In Budapest (2012)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/A Strange Hour In Budapest

Other works by Alan Wilder

Ebbhead (1991)

Main article: List of Recoil sample sources by album/Ebbhead

Between the conclusion of the World Violation Tour and the recording of Songs Of Faith And Devotion, Alan Wilder would enter London's KONK Studios to record Recoil's Bloodline between January and March 1991. A month later, he would return to the studio to produce Depeche Mode support act Nitzer Ebb's Ebbhead record in collaboration with producer Flood and mix engineer Steve Lyon.

Spirit of Talk Talk (2012)

"Dum Dum Girl feat. Shara Worden"

"Dum Dum Girl feat. Shara Worden" - Recoil
2012

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes
Reversed orchestral ambience A.R. Rahman - 127 Hours: Music from the Motion Picture - "Acid Darbari" - 2 November 2010
Confirmed
A reversed section of audio derived from "Acid Darbari" by A.R. Rahman as featured on the 2010 127 Hours film soundtrack is utilised in the intro of the 2012 Recoil cover of Talk Talk's "Dum Dum Girl".
Percussion elements Depeche Mode - "Nothing's Impossible" - 2005
Confirmed

"Inheritance"

"Inheritance" - Recoil
2012

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes
Vocal, ambient elements Anja Garbarek - Smiling & Waving - "It Seems We Talk" - 26 March 2001
Confirmed
A series of manipulated audio samples derived from "It Seems We Talk" by Norweigan singer-songwriter Anja Garbarek as featured on the 2001 album Smiling & Waving are utilised throughout the 2012 Recoil cover of Talk Talk's "Inheritance". Notably, Garbarek collaborated with Mark Hollis of Talk Talk on three other songs featured on Smiling & Waving, including "The Gown", "Big Mouth", and "The Diver".[4]
Snare drum Fine Young Cannibals - The Raw & the Cooked - "She Drives Me Crazy" - 26 December 1988
Confirmed
A manipulated snare drum derived from the opening moments of the Fine Young Cannibals's 1988 single "She Drives Me Crazy".[footnotes 2][5] is utilised sporadically in the intro of the Recoil cover of Talk Talk's "Inheritance".[footnotes 3]
Percussion elements Depeche Mode - "Nothing's Impossible" - 2005
Unconfirmed

Remixes by Alan Wilder

"Time Turns Around (Eurotech Version)"

"Time Turns Around (Eurotech Version)" - Toni Halliday
1989
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Bass synth Alan Wilder's (Eurotech Version) remix of Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" utilises a four-note bass synth sequence derived from a longer seven note sequence originally recorded for use throughout Depeche Mode's "Never Let Me Down Again".

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes
Snare drum Fine Young Cannibals - "She Drives Me Crazy" - 26 December 1988
Confirmed
A manipulated snare drum audible likely derived from the opening moments of the Fine Young Cannibals 1988 single "She Drives Me Crazy" is utilised throughout the "Eurotech" remix of "Time Turns Around". Prior to any editing applied post-sampling, the original snare's characteristic "pop" effect was achieved by recording the snare separately, then placing a speaker on top of the snare drum and a microphone below it, with the original recording played through the speaker and re-recorded.[6] Notably, this sound would later be used throughout Depeche Mode's "Halo".
Piano/bass guitar stab Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds Volume 1 - Funk Bass
Confirmed
A bass guitar stab heard throughout the "Eurotech" remix of "Time Turns Around" is likely derived from the Emulator III Universe Of Sounds Volume 1 voice "Funk Bass". Notably, this sound would later see use throughout Depeche Mode's "Policy Of Truth".

"Come Alive"

"Come Alive" - Nitzer Ebb
1990

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Synthesizer elements Bassomatic - "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Bass" - 1990
Confirmed
A filtered rhythm element derived from a synthesizer heard in the intro of the 1990 Bassomatic song "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Bass" for the album of the same name is time-stretched and re-pitched for use in "Come Alive" starting from the four minute ten second mark.[7]
Ambient elements, phone ringing Akai S1000/S1100 Sound Library - SE1003 BELLS - "PHONE"
Confirmed
A manipulated sample of a telephone ringing derived from Akai S1000/S1000 sound library disk "SE1003 BELLS" is utilised sporadically throughout "Come Alive".[footnotes 4]

"In Chains (Alan Wilder Remix)"

"In Chains (Alan Wilder Remix)" - Depeche Mode
2011
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Bass elements A textured bass element originally recorded for Depeche Mode's "Black Celebration" is confirmed by Wilder as having been re-purposed for his remix of "In Chains".

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Ambient elements Depeche Mode - "I Want It All" - 2005
Official
A synthesized pad phrase originally recorded for Depeche Mode's "I Want It All" is confirmed by Wilder as having been re-purposed for his remix of "In Chains".
Orchestral elements Depeche Mode - "I Am You" - 2001
Official
An orchestral string passage originally recorded for Depeche Mode's "I Am You" is confirmed by Wilder as having been re-purposed for his remix of "In Chains".
Guitar elements The Durutti Column - Vini Reilly - "Requiem Again" - March 1989
Confirmed
A series of manipulated, processed sections of audio derived from "Requiem Again" by The Durutti Column are utilised in the outro section of the Alan Wilder remix of "In Chains".
Ambient, orchestral elements Jonny Greenwood - Bodysong - "Bode Radio/Glass Light/Broken Hearts" - 27 October 2003
Confirmed
A series of audio samples featuring atmospheric and orchestral elements derived from "Bode Radio/Glass Light/Broken Hearts" by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood for the 2003 Bodysong film soundtrack is utilised in the opening verse sections of the Alan Wilder remix of "In Chains".

Click to display/hide audio example

Drum, bass guitar elements UNKLE - War Stories - "Keys to the Kingdom" - 20 June 2007
Confirmed
A section of audio derived from "Keys to the Kingdom" by UNKLE is utilised in the outro of the Alan Wilder remix of "In Chains".
Piano, orchestral, vocal elements Massive Attack - "Paradise Circus (Breakage's Tight Rope Remix)" - 8 February 2010
Confirmed
A series of piano and orchestral string phrases playing both forwards and in reverse derived from "Paradise Circus (Breakage's Tight Rope Remix)" by Massive Attack are utilised in the outro of the Alan Wilder remix of "In Chains".

"I Am Undone (Alan Wilder Remix)"

"I Am Undone (Alan Wilder Remix)" - Nitzer Ebb
2011

Sample sources
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Tom drum, cymbal elements Scott Walker - Tilt - "Manhattan" - 1995
Confirmed
A manipulated section of audio derived from "Manhattan" by Scott Walker is utilised throughout "I Am Undone (Alan Wilder Remix)".

References

  1. Source: Shunt Q&A: ARCHIVES : Recoil : 1 + 2 / HYDROLOGY
  2. Sources: Interview with Alan Wilder for Wyborcza Poland, 2010-04-19 + Interview with Alan Wilder for devotees.pl, 2008-02-21
  3. Transcribed by Aleksandra Lech for DMLiveWiki on 2019-07-30
  4. "Garbarek, Anja". Biography (in Norwegian). Norsk musikkinformasjon MIC.no. 6 August 2006.
  5. Daley, Dan (1 March 2001). "Classic Tracks: Fine Young Cannibals' "She Drives Me Crazy"".
  6. Daley, Dan (1 March 2001). "Classic Tracks: Fine Young Cannibals' "She Drives Me Crazy"".
  7. Credit to 'Fatherless Child' for this discovery.

Notes

  1. Fan credit: Richard López.
  2. Prior to any editing applied post-sampling, the original snare's characteristic "pop" effect was achieved by recording the snare separately, then placing a speaker on top of the snare drum and a microphone below it, with the original recording played through the speaker and re-recorded.
  3. Notably, this sound is also used throughout Wilder's 1989 "Eurotech Version" remix of Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" and Depeche Mode's "Halo".
  4. Fan credit: Richard López.