Depeche Mode sample sources 81-85

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This article is about the various sample sources used on Depeche Mode songs recorded between 1981 and 1985. For sample sources used on Depeche Mode songs recorded between 1986 and 1998, see Depeche Mode sample sources 86>98. For sample sources used on Depeche Mode songs recorded between 2000 and the present day, see Depeche Mode sample sources 2000-present. For sample sources used on Recoil works, see Recoil sample sources.
Glossary
Terms used in this article

In audio production, sampling refers to the use of a portion (or sample) from a sound recording within another recording. As pioneers of the electronic music genre in the early 1980s, Depeche Mode were among the most prolific acts to make use of sampling technology within a traditional pop music format. Among the thousands of original samples recorded and utilized by Depeche Mode to enhance the atmosphere of their musical output are many that originated elsewhere, including brief passages of musical recordings by other artists, snippets of audio from television shows, radio broadcasts, films, environmental sounds, and more. Analysis of these sample sources and how they are manipulated is a popular topic of discussion amongst fans of the group.

Key
Official
The sample is confirmed to have been used in the specified song by a past/present member of Depeche Mode, an individual involved in its production, or band archivist Daniel "BRAT" Barassi.
Confirmed
The sample is independently confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Likely
The sample is likely to have been used in the specified song but has not yet been confirmed.
Unconfirmed
The sample is not yet confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Disproven
The sample is confirmed to not have been used in the specified song.
Unknown
It is unclear if the sample was used in the specified song.

Information

This page aims to document all verifiable sound sources for many of the musical parts used by Depeche Mode in the production of their studio albums, official remixes, live performances, and other works released between 1981 and 1985.

Due to the manipulated nature of the samples described in this article, there is unavoidable potential for error or sample misattribution. To ensure accuracy, this article strives to use verified quotes from band members and recording personnel with citations wherever possible, audio examples, and independent research voluntarily contributed by Depeche Mode and Recoil fans worldwide. This article provides an interesting document on this topic in a tabular format that is organized, well-researched, and reasonably accurate. Please bear in mind that due to the limited number of relevant quotes for each sample from band members or associates involved in producing the music described on this page, audio samples that lack official confirmation are not guaranteed to be accurate.

This article differentiates samples by origin: Self-made samples, which describe any material initially recorded by Depeche Mode or Recoil, and Sourced samples, which describe samples not initially recorded by either group. In addition to confirmed samples, this article also covers samples commonly misreported as having been used but directly refuted by a member or associate of Depeche Mode or Recoil.

If you notice an error or wish to contribute or request the removal of information contained within this article, please feel free to contact us.

Speak & Spell (1981)

"Just Can't Get Enough" - Depeche Mode
1981
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Bell-like melody accent In May 2020, fan "DMK" kindly provided DM Live Wiki with documentation for a series of Emulator II floppy disks that accompanied a collection of restored studio equipment used by Music For The Masses producer Dave Bascombe during the production of music albums for artists other than Depeche Mode in the mid to late eighties. One floppy disk, labeled "Glass (10)", features an untitled preset ("NULL PRESET"), which contains a bell-like sample. This bell element is used to play a melodic accent on the main melody best heard in the opening moments of the Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Just Can't Get Enough". Notably, a variation of this sound is used during the middle eight section of "Master And Servant" as it was performed on the aforementioned tour as well as the World Violation tour.

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a sample from the Emax I sound bank containing the musical parts performed by Alan Wilder for use during the Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Just Can't Get Enough" is compared to the equivalent sample in Bascombe's Emulator II disk "Glass (10)". The two parts are then played together, producing audible phasing artifacts when superimposed.

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Trumpet stabs Emulator II factory library disk #21: Assorted Trombones - Preset #1: "7 TRUMPETS", SAMPLE 4
Confirmed
The Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Just Can't Get Enough" employs a sample of a trumpet derived from the "7 TRUMPETS" preset of Emulator II factory library disk #21 "Assorted Trombones".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a sample from the Emulator II factory library disk #21 "Assorted Trombones" is played back in full, and is then used to play an approximate ascending brass line similar to the equivalent part as it was performed in the Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Just Can't Get Enough" (live audio snippet derived from the 101 live album).

A Broken Frame (1982)

"Leave In Silence" - Depeche Mode
1982

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Orchestral string layer Korg 01/W Bank A, voice #77: ArcoAttack - SAMPLE "127 F#5"
Confirmed
The unplayed Devotional tour arrangement of "Leave In Silence" was planned to include an orchestral string sample derived from the "ArcoAttack" voice of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer layered with an organ-like sample for use as a pad.
Electric piano Korg 01/W Bank B, voice #81: Digi Years - SAMPLE "127 C5" and Bank B, voice #24: Acoustic Guitar - SAMPLE "127 F#4"
Confirmed
The unplayed Devotional tour arrangement of "Leave In Silence" was planned to include electric piano and acoustic guitar samples derived from the "Digi Years" and "Acoustic Guitar" voices of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer.
Brass swells Korg 01/W Bank B, voice #92: SFZ Brass - SAMPLE "127 C5-L", SAMPLE "127 C5-R"
Confirmed
The Devotional arrangement of "Leave In Silence" was planned to include an edited brass swell sample derived from the "SFZ Brass" voice of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer.

"Shouldn't Have Done That" - Depeche Mode
1982
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Ambient marching Daniel Miller described the origin of this sound in the sleeve notes for the 2006 A Broken Frame remaster CD: "I remember we got Blancmange in to do some on-the-spot marching for 'Shouldn't Have Done That' because they were in the studio next door, making their record, and they were mates with Depeche Mode."[1]

Construction Time Again (1983)

"Love, In Itself" - Depeche Mode
1983

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Synthesized choir pad Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #3 - 2338 Voices #1
Confirmed
The synthesized solo choir sound audible throughout "Love, In Itself" is derived from the "Voices #1" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #3.

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a section of the outro as heard in the center channel of the 2006 5.1 reissue containing the relevant synth choir sound is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (timbre "2338 Voices 1" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).
Chorus kalimba arpeggio Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #1 - 2136 Calimba #2
Confirmed
The percussive kalimba-like arpeggio heard during the chorus sections of "Love, In Itself" is derived from the "Calimba #2" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #1. Notably, this sound is also utilised throughout "It Doesn't Matter" and the middle eight section of "If You Want".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a section of the third chorus as heard in the rear right channel of the 2006 5.1 reissue containing the relevant synth line is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (timbre "2136 CALIMBA 2" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).
Synth pad Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #3 - 2382 String Section
Confirmed
A synth pad sound derived from the "String Section" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #3 is utilised throughout the verse sections of "Love, In Itself", heard most prominently during the third verse.

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a section of the third verse as heard in the rear right channel of the 2006 5.1 reissue containing the relevant synth line is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (timbre "2382 STRING SECTION" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).

"Everything Counts" - Depeche Mode
1983
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
One-shot guitar chug Part of the "chugging" guitar rhythm most clearly heard during the opening bars and throughout "Mercy In You" is sampled, transposed up several notes, and filtered to produce a rhythmic element heard during the choruses and break section of "Everything Counts" as it was performed on the Devotional tour.
Middle eight melody The middle eight melody as heard in the Devotional arrangement of "Everything Counts" is performed using a series of edited samples derived from an e-bow guitar performance originally recorded for use in "Walking In My Shoes".

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Chorus synth riff Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 Bank B: "CALIOPE"
Confirmed
The Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs a series of two metallic synth samples reminiscent of a calliope for use as a riff during the chorus and outro sections. The samples are derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 program "CALIOPE" and are performed via the E-MU Emax sampling keyboard.
Ascending/descending two note melody Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #4 Bank A: "OBOE"
Confirmed
The Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs an oboe-like sample derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #4 program "OBOE". The sample is layered with a separate sample for sporadic use as an oscillating two note swell occurring once per bar throughout the song.
Xylophone melody Korg 01/W Bank A, voice #10: GhostRyder - SAMPLE "127 C5"
Confirmed
The Devotional tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs an edited "ghostly" percussive sample derived from the "GhostRyder" voice of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer. The sample is layered with a self-made xylophone sample derived from the studio recording of "Everything Counts" to form the lead xylophone melody instrument.
Orchestral strings Korg 01/W Bank A, voice #07: TheStrings - SAMPLE "127 F#3", SAMPLE "127 C5", SAMPLE "127 C2", SAMPLE "127 C3" and Bank A, voice #77: ArcoAttack - SAMPLE "127 F#5"
Confirmed
The Devotional tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs an orchestral string instrument during its chorus and outro sections that is comprised of a series of stock and edited orchestral string samples derived from the "TheStrings" and "ArcoAttack" voices of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer. Varying combinations of the "TheStrings" samples are layered together to form octaves, which were subsequently recorded to form a single sample in which the octave is "baked" into the sample (in order, these samples are "127 C2", "127 C3", and "127 F#3": "127 C2" and "127 C3" combine to form an octave chord playing an A; "127 C2" and "127 C3" then combine to form a similar octave playing an E; and "127 F#3" and "127 C3" combine to form an alternate A octave one key above the original A octave). Conversely, samples "127 F#3", "127 C5", and the "ArcoAttack" "127 F#5" sample are also utilised separately as non-octave samples. The resulting orchestral string instrument was performed by Alan Wilder.

Notably, varying combinations of these samples are also utilised for use in the Devotional arrangements of "A Question Of Lust" and "I Want You Now", as well as the unplayed Devotional arrangement for "Leave In Silence".

Verse synth layer Korg 01/W Bank B, voice #51: Super Tine - SAMPLE "80 C6"
Confirmed
The Devotional tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs an electric piano-like tine sample derived from the "Super Tine" voice of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer. The sample is layered with a self-made synth sample to form the synth stabs performed during the verse sections.
Resonant synth pad E-MU Emax II Elements Of Sound Volume 1 - "Synth World" - Preset #2: "Synth Wash", SAMPLE 21, SAMPLE 22
Confirmed
A resonant synth pad derived from the "Synth Wash" preset of the E-MU Emax II Elements Of Sound Volume 1 factory disk "Synth World" is used to play a series of chords during the chorus and outro of "Everything Counts" as it was performed on the World Violation tour and during the outro of the Devotional tour arrangement.
Verse fill Korg 01/W Bank B, voice #71: PercussiveOrgan 2 - SAMPLE "127 F#4"
Confirmed
The Devotional tour arrangement of "Everything Counts" employs an edited percussive organ sample derived from the "PercussiveOrgan 2" voice of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer. The organ sample is layered with another sample to form the melodic fill performed during the verse sections.
Breathing sound Kraftwerk - "Tour de France" - 1983
Unknown
Intro sweep Kraftwerk - "The Robots" - 1978
Unknown

"The Landscape Is Changing" - Depeche Mode
1983

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Spoken word in German Einstürzende Neubauten - "Merle (Die Elektrik)" - 1983
Unknown

"Told You So" - Depeche Mode
1983

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Middle eight organ E-MU Emulator I factory library disk #28 Prod Set - "Pipe Organ (L) (04-005-102M1) - Pipe Organ (U) (04-005-101M1)"
Confirmed
The middle eight section of "Told You So" employs a pipe organ instrument derived from Emulator I factory library disk #28 "Pipe Organ - Pipe Organ".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, Emulator I factory disk $28 "Pipe Organ - Pipe Organ" is compared to the middle eight section of "Told You So" as heard in the center channel of the 2006 Construction Time Again 5.1 reissue.

Some Great Reward (1984)

"Something To Do" - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Rhythm piano Korg 01/W Bank A, voice #01: 16' Piano - SAMPLE "127 C2" and Bank B, voice #01: 8' Piano - SAMPLE "100 C3" and Bank B, voice #27: String Pad - SAMPLE "60 C2", SAMPLE "60 C3"
Confirmed
The Devotional tour arrangement of "Something To Do" employs a series of piano and string pad samples derived from the "16' Piano", "8' Piano", and "String Pad" voices of the Korg 01/W workstation synthesizer. Sample "127 C2" from the "16' Piano" voice and "60 C2" from the "StringPad" voice are layered and recorded to form a combined sample with a root key of F3. Similarly, sample "100 C3" from the "8' Piano" voice and "60 C3" from the "StringPad" voice are layered and recorded to form a combined sample with a root key of C4. The resulting piano/string samples make up the bass notes of the rhythm performed live by Alan Wilder during the verse and chorus sections.
Bell-like rhythm Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #3 Bank B: "CELESTE"
The Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Something To Do" employs a bell-like sample derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #3 program "CELESTE". The sample is performed as a rhythm part throughout the song.

"Lie To Me" - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Lead melody Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #2 - 2263 Oboe Source
Confirmed
The lead melody heard throughout "Lie To Me" is derived from the "Oboe Source" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #2. Notably, similar edits of this timbre are also used throughout "Blasphemous Rumours" and the middle eight section of "It Doesn't Matter Two".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a section of the intro as heard in the center channel of the 2006 5.1 reissue containing the relevant synth line is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (patch "2263 OBOE SOURCE" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).

"It Doesn't Matter" - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Kalimba Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #1 - 2136 Calimba #2
Confirmed
The kalimba instrument audible throughout the verse sections of "It Doesn't Matter" is derived from the "Calimba #2" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #1. Notably, this timbre is also used during the chorus sections of "Love, In Itself" and the middle eight of "If You Want".

"Master And Servant" - Depeche Mode
1984
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Middle eight melody In May 2020, fan "DMK" kindly provided DM Live Wiki with documentation for a series of Emulator II floppy disks that accompanied a collection of restored studio equipment used by Music For The Masses producer Dave Bascombe during the production of music albums for artists other than Depeche Mode in the mid to late eighties. One floppy disk, labeled "Glass (10)", features an untitled preset ("NULL PRESET"), which contains a bell-like sample. This bell element is used to play a G♯ octave, which is subsequently sampled and layered with a manipulated piano sound to form the melody played on every second bar during the middle eight of "Master And Servant" as it was performed on the Music For The Masses and World Violation tours. Notably, this sound is also used as a melodic accent throughout the Music For The Masses tour arrangement of "Just Can't Get Enough".

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Middle eight melody Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 Bank B: "TOY PIANO"
Confirmed
A metallic bell-like melody performed during the middle eight section of "Master And Servant" as it was performed on the Music For The Masses tour is derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 program "TOY PIANO".

"If You Want" - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Middle eight kalimba melody Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #1 - 2136 Calimba #2
Likely

"Blasphemous Rumours" - Depeche Mode
1984
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Verse snare The snare heard during the verse sections of "Blasphemous Rumours" was produced by recording the sound of a hammer smashing against a concrete floor.[2] Alan Wilder states in the November 1984 issue of International Musician and Recording World:

We sampled some concrete being hit for what turned out to be the snare sound. All that entailed was us hitting a big lump of concrete with a sampling hammer. The engineer / producer we use, Gareth Jones, has got this brilliant little recorder called a Stellavox which we use with two stereo mikes and it's as good as any standard 30ips reel-to-reel but this is very small and therefore very portable. So we just took the Stellavox out into the middle of this big, ambient space and miked up the ground and hit it with a big metal hammer. The sound was... like concrete being hit. I can't really put it any other way.

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Oboe melody Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #2 - 2263 Oboe Source
Confirmed
The atmospheric oboe melody heard throughout "Blasphemous Rumours" is derived from the "Oboe Source" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #2. Wilder comments on the composition of this sound in the Shunt "The Singles 81-85" editorial:

Musically too, [Blasphemous Rumours] stood out from the crowd and once again proved that only a group like [Depeche Mode] (with a track whose opening bars featured the unlikely combination of a backwards oboe against a hammer crashing onto concrete) could subvert the pop charts and still have a hit record on their hands.[3]

Middle eight bell melody Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 Bank B: "TOY PIANO"
Confirmed
A metallic, bell-like sound derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 program "TOY PIANO" is used to perform a melody during the first middle eight section of "Blasphemous Rumours" as it was performed on the Music For The Masses tour.
Post-chorus melody Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #2 Bank A: "SAX BC"
Confirmed
The metallic saxophone-like synth melody following the first and second chorus sections of "Blasphemous Rumours" as it was performed on the Music For The Masses tour is comprised of a sample derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #2 program "SAX BC".

"Master And Servant" (Slavery Whip Mix) - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Drum elements Frankie Goes To Hollywood - "Relax" - 1983
Disproven
Magazine The Face reported in February 1985:

Alan Wilder: No, I don't mind admitting it. We nicked a beat off one of Frankie's records and stuck it on our 12-inch. But I mean the actual sound, not the idea. It's not a drum sound that sells a record anyway, it's the whole song and the musical ideas. [...]

In 1986, Electronics & Music Maker magazine reported: "In response to a complaint that Depeche Mode stole a Frankie Goes To Hollywood drum sound, Frankie's engineers replied that the Frankie drum sound was actually a Linn - itself a recording!"

Wilder directly refutes this claim in response to a fan question during a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil project site:

Q: [Is there] any truth behind the section in Dave Thompson's book (Depeche Mode: Some Great Reward) that says (around the time of "Master And Servant") that [Depeche Mode] sampled a Frankie Goes To Hollywood drum loop? If so, what track was it used on?

A: Surprisingly, no truth whatsoever.[2]

"People Are People" (Are People People? Mix) - Depeche Mode
1984

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Doo-wop vocal sample The Citadels - "When I Woke Up This Morning" - 1964
Official
Credit to Daniel Barassi for this discovery.[4]

Catching Up with Depeche Mode (1985)

"Shake The Disease" - Depeche Mode
1985
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Celeste-like bell A filtered bell element reminiscent of a celeste is employed during the post-chorus sections layered with a variety of other parts, including a separate bell sample and synthesized parts. This distinctive sound would also see use in several other Depeche Mode songs recorded during this era, including "It Doesn't Matter Two" and "But Not Tonight".
Metallic percussive element A textured, highly-resonant percussive element with a high frequency is used during the post-chorus sections layered with several other parts and processed with reverb. The sample is re-triggered to play in time with the bell melody, and is played in two ways: one where the sample is re-triggered in time with the bell melody and then allowed to play out (or allowed to play from beginning to end) on the seventh keypress, and one where the sample cuts away on the seventh keypress without playing in full. Notably, this sample is also used in several other songs recorded by Depeche Mode between 1984 and 1985, including "It Doesn't Matter".
Verse melody synth layer A synth sample originally recorded for use during the verse sections of "Everything Counts" is layered with a separate sample to form the eight note melody performed throughout the first half of each verse section. This sample is also used to subtle effect throughout the chorus sections of "Here Is The House".

Click to display/hide audio example

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Middle eight melody Yamaha DX7 factory ROM #1 Bank B: "CALIOPE"
Confirmed
A manipulated calliope-esque sample derived from the Yamaha DX7 factory Rom #1 program "CALIOPE" is layered with a series of other instruments to form the layered melody performed during the middle eight section of "Shake The Disease".

Click to display/hide audio example

Verse melody Emulator II factory library disk #04: Grand Piano - Preset #1: "Piano #1"
Confirmed
"Shake The Disease" utilises a series of edited samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #04 "Grand Piano". As is common practice with multi-sampled instruments, the samples are keymapped onto separate sections of a sampler keyboard in accordance with their pitch to approximate the differences in tone between notes of differing octaves on a traditional piano, and are subsequently layered with a guitar-like sample to form the melody performed in the latter half of each verse section.

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, Emulator II factory disk #04 "Grand Piano" is compared to a selection of audio from the "Remixed Extended" remix of "Shake The Disease" (played out of phase to more clearly expose the verse melody) to demonstrate the similarity in tone between the Emulator II contents and one layer of the verse melody.
Chorus synth melody layer Synclavier II Resynth Library Disk #4 - 4464 Harp
Confirmed
A harp-like synth pluck sound derived from the "Harp" timbre of Synclavier II Resynth library diskette #4 is layered with a separate sampled sound to form the lead melody heard during the chorus sections of "Shake The Disease".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a selection of audio derived from "Shake The Disease" is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (Resynth timbre "4464 Harp" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).
Post-chorus bell melody layer Synclavier II Timbre Directory Diskette #3 - 2337 Chimes #1
Confirmed
A bell-like chime sound derived from the "Chimes #1" timbre of Synclavier II timbre directory diskette #3 is used to play a basic two octave seven note melody layered with a series of other sounds to form the bell melody heard during the post-chorus sections of "Shake The Disease".

Click to display/hide audio example

Note: In this example, a selection of audio derived from "Shake The Disease" (played out of phase to more clearly expose the sound in question) is compared to the source sound as produced by the Arturia Synclavier V, a Synclavier VST emulation (Resynth timbre "2337 Chimes #1" courtesy of Synclavier co-inventor Cameron Jones via "Timbre Share" Facebook group).
Hi-hats (open and closed), snare drum, bass drum Yamaha RX-11 - Digital Rhythm Programmer - 1984
Confirmed
A series of bass drum, snare drum, and hi-hat samples derived from the Yamaha RX-11 programmable drum machine are utilised throughout "Shake The Disease".

"It's Called A Heart" - Depeche Mode
1985
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Sampled guitar-like loop "It's Called A Heart" makes sporadic use of a looped guitar part during the instrumental breaks following each chorus section. This sample would later famously be used to form the lead melody heard throughout "A Question Of Time".

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Bass Emulator II factory library disk #06: Bass, Synth, Drums - Preset #1: "Bass Synth 1"
Confirmed
"It's Called A Heart" utilises a bass guitar sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #06 "Bass, Synth, Drums".
Choir pad Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices - Preset #1: "Voices 1", SAMPLE 3
Confirmed
The "ghostly" choir pad audible throughout the intro and verse sections of "It's Called A Heart" features a sample derived from the "Voices 1" preset of Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices". Notably, this sample is also used throughout "But Not Tonight".

"Flexible" - Depeche Mode
1985

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Bass Emulator II factory library disk #06: Bass, Synth, Drums - Preset #1: "Bass Synth 1"
Confirmed
"Flexible" utilises a bass guitar sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #06 "Bass, Synth, Drums".
Choir pad Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices - Preset #1: "Voices 1", SAMPLE 3
Confirmed
A sample derived from the "Voices 1" preset of Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices" is utilised throughout "Flexible".

References

  1. Source: A Broken Frame 2006 remaster CD sleeve notes.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Source: SHUNT : ARCHIVES : DEPECHE MODE : SOME GREAT REWARD
  3. "The Singles 81-85". oldsite.recoil.co.uk
  4. Source: Depeche Mode archivist and webmaster Daniel Barassi ('fishureprice') Instagram post