List of Depeche Mode sample sources by album/Violator

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Glossary
Terms used in this article

In audio production, sampling refers to the use of a portion (or sample) from a sound within another recording. As pioneers of the electronic music genre, Depeche Mode were among the most prolific acts to make use of sampling technology within a traditional pop music format. Among the many original samples recorded and utilized by Depeche Mode to enhance the atmosphere of their musical output are many that originated elsewhere, including brief passages of musical recordings by other artists, snippets of audio from television shows, radio broadcasts, films, environmental sounds, and more. Analysis of these sample sources and how they are manipulated is a popular topic of discussion amongst fans of the group.

Key
Official
The sample is confirmed to have been used in the specified song by a past/present member of Depeche Mode, an individual involved in its production, or band archivist Daniel "BRAT" Barassi.
Confirmed
The sample is independently confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Likely
The sample is likely to have been used in the specified song but has not yet been confirmed.
Unconfirmed
The sample is not yet confirmed to have been used in the specified song.
Disproven
The sample is confirmed to not have been used in the specified song.
Unknown
It is unclear if the sample was used in the specified song.

Information

This page aims to document all verifiable sound sources for many of the musical parts used by Depeche Mode in the production of their 1990 album Violator.

Due to the manipulated nature of the samples described in this article, there is unavoidable potential for error or sample misattribution. To ensure accuracy, this article strives to use verified quotes from band members and recording personnel with citations wherever possible, audio examples, and independent research voluntarily contributed by Depeche Mode and Recoil fans worldwide. This article provides an interesting document on this topic in a tabular format that is organized, well-researched, and reasonably accurate. Please bear in mind that due to the limited number of relevant quotes for each sample from band members or associates involved in producing the music described on this page, audio samples that lack official confirmation are not guaranteed to be accurate.

This article differentiates samples by origin: Self-made samples, which describe any material initially recorded by Depeche Mode or Recoil, and Sourced samples, which describe samples not initially recorded by either group. In addition to confirmed samples, this article also covers samples commonly misreported as having been used but directly refuted by a member or associate of Depeche Mode or Recoil.

If you notice an error or wish to contribute or request the removal of information contained within this article, please feel free to contact us.

Violator (1990)

1. "World In My Eyes"

"World In My Eyes" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Minimoog/ARP 2600 bass The origin of the bass is a combination of a series of unique synthesized parts. According to Wilder, the bass parts are likely to have originated from the Minimoog and Flood's ARP 2600.[1]
Vocal "ahh" samples A series of solo vocal "ahh" samples likely derived from vocals by Martin Gore play an oscillating melody during the outro of "World In My Eyes".[footnotes 1]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Snare drum Fad Gadget - Fireside Favourites - "Newsreel" - 7 November 1980
Confirmed
A manipulated snare derived from the opening moments of "Newsreel" from the 1980 Fad Gadget album Fireside Favourites is utilised throughout "World In My Eyes". Notably, this sample would also see use in the outro of "Personal Jesus". Former Depeche Mode member Alan Wilder recalled the snare drum sound of "World In My Eyes" in an undated Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil project site: "[...] I think we made it from scratch or it could be a combination of analogue and a sample."[1]

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Guitar elements Fleetwood Mac - "Black Magic Woman" - 29 March 1968
Confirmed
A guitar chord featured in the intro of Fleetwood Mac's 1968 single "Black Magic Woman" is utilised sporadically throughout "World In My Eyes". The guitar sound was performed by Fleetwood Mac founder Peter Green, who achieved its distinct shimmering effect by playing a D minor triad on the 17th fret with vibrato. A manipulated copy of the sample is played with an oscillating pitch bend layered with a separate sample (derived from Emulator II factory library disk #37: Electric Guitar) to produce a wavering verse section riff. A second copy of the sample appears on the first beat after each chorus section.[footnotes 2]

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Pitch bending verse section fill Emulator II factory library disk #36: Lead Guitar
Confirmed
An electric guitar sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #36 "Lead Guitar" is played in reverse with an oscillating pitch bend and layered with a separate sample (derived from Fleetwood Mac's "Black Magic Woman") to produce the "whirl" effect that occurs during the verse sections.
Punchy drum fill Bryan Ferry - Boys and Girls - "Don't Stop The Dance" - 1985
Confirmed
A drum element derived from the album version of Bryan Ferry's "Don't Stop The Dance" is utilised throughout "World In My Eyes" as a drum fill.

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Orchestral strings Emulator II factory library disk #05: Marcato Strings
Confirmed
The verse, chorus and outro sections of "World In My Eyes" feature orchestral string chords played using the "Marcato Strg" preset of Emulator II factory library disk #05 "Marcato Strings".

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"Orchestral" hit/synthesizer stab Thomas Dolby - The Golden Age of Wireless - "She Blinded Me with Science" - 1982
Confirmed
A synth hit derived from the final moments of Thomas Dolby's 1982 single "She Blinded Me with Science" is utilised as an orchestral hit during the final bar of each chorus section of "World In My Eyes"

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"Clicking" verse percussion rhythm Kraftwerk - The Man-Machine - "The Man-Machine" ("Die Mensch-Maschine") - May 1978
Confirmed
"World In My Eyes" utilises a timestretched "clicking" percussion rhythm throughout its verse, chorus, and outro sections that is derived from the opening moments of Kraftwerk's "The Man-Machine".

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"Squelchy" snare accent Kraftwerk - Computer World - "Home Computer" ("Heimcomputer") - 1981
Confirmed
"World In My Eyes" employs a manipulated sample derived from the latter half of Kraftwerk's "Home Computer".[footnotes 3]

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Chorus rock organ Emax I factory library disk #ZD703: Rock Organ - SAMPLE 4
Confirmed
A manipulated sample of an organ derived from Emax I factory library disk #ZD703 "Rock Organ" is utilized throughout the chorus sections of "World In My Eyes".

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Bass layer Sound Ideas - Series 1000 General Effects Library - CD #1018 Naval Boats, Ships, Motorcycles - Track #35 "SHIP, HORN" (filename "ShipHorn 1018_35") - 1983[footnotes 4]
Confirmed
A truncated sample of a naval ship horn derived from Sound Ideas's 1983 sound effects library Series 1000 General Effects Library CD #1018 Naval Boats, Ships, Motorcycles is utilised throughout the chorus sections of "World In My Eyes" as a bass layer. The library is notable for debuting as the first commercially available sound effects library of its kind on compact disc.

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Synth string Akai S1000/S1100 Sound Library - Violin Ensemble SL1093 - "E5 VL-E"
Likely
A processed sample of a violin derived from Akai S1000/S1000 sound library disk "Violin Ensemble SL1093" is likely utilised as a pre-chorus section riser throughout "World In My Eyes".

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2. "Sweetest Perfection"

"Sweetest Perfection" - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Bell tree sample Fleetwood Mac - "Black Magic Woman" - 29 March 1968
Confirmed
This sample is looped and manipulated to produce a ghostly pad with oscillating pitch and creative panning effects during the verses.

3. "Personal Jesus"

"Personal Jesus" - Depeche Mode
1989
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Foot stomp drum elements Wilder recalls in separate Q&A and Editorial features on Shunt, the official Recoil project site: "The main stomps... [were] a recording of 2 or 3 people jumping up and down on flight cases."[1][2]
Slide guitar fill Album producer Flood recalled the unique slide guitar sound recorded on the second day of production on "Personal Jesus" in his 2011 Mute Short Circuit presentation:

I'd said, well, I always thought that on the original demo [for Personal Jesus], [the slide guitar part] sounded like voices. Somebody going "Rahh!" And they all looked at me as though I was mad. I said [...] if we just combine the two sounds, it would be unique, it won't be just a slide guitar [...] And [Dave Gahan] finally turned around and goes "What, like this? Rahhh!" I went "Yes, exactly like that!" So Dave went, alright then, sample this then: "Rahhh!" I went "Yep, that's perfect!" They were all looking at me as though I was mad! But, that is half of the sound that you hear when you hear the finished article.

Breathing rhythm Album producer Flood describes the origin of the "Personal Jesus" breathing rhythm recorded on the third day of the song's production in his 2011 Mute Short Circuit presentation:

The next day, we [started] to do the famous breath. And the breath came about because we wanted to do, we were trying harmonica actually, to do the bass part and that type of sound. And the sound just wasn't right, but what we did like was the sound of someone going "Haah", and so we got a load of "Haah" from [Martin Gore], and I think [Alan Wilder] as well, and then chucked them all together. And that makes up the "ooh-ooh-ooh-ahh-ahh-ahh", it's all from trying to get the harmonica for a bass sound.

Tom drum fills An ambient drum sample originally recorded for use with 1983's "Pipeline" is utilised in combination with a tom drum sound originally recorded for use with 1987's "I Want You Now" to form a series of two unique drum fills preceding each verse section.

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
"Metallic" hi-hat Emulator II factory library disk #71: DAS Synth
Confirmed
A lo-fi synthesizer sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #71 "DAS Synth" is played several keys above its root key to produce a metallic ticking sound that is used in place of a hi-hat starting from the second chorus section of "Personal Jesus".

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Clap-like percussion Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Volume 2 - Tough Tones - "NOISE BURST"
Confirmed
A treated copy of a clap-like percussive sound derived from the Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds "Tough Tones" voice is utilised throughout "Personal Jesus" starting from the second chorus section.

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Snare drum Fad Gadget - Fireside Favourites - "Newsreel" - 7 November 1980
Confirmed
A manipulated snare sound derived from the opening moments of "Newsreel" from the 1980 Fad Gadget album Fireside Favourites is utilised throughout the outro of the album version of "Personal Jesus". Notably, this sample would also see use throughout "World In My Eyes". Former Depeche Mode member Alan Wilder recalled the snare drum sound of "World In My Eyes" in an undated Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil project site: "[...] I think we made it from scratch or it could be a combination of analogue and a sample."[1]
Bass guitar Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Volume 1 - Machine Set - "Stein Bass A1", "Stein Bass D2"
Confirmed
A series of bass guitar samples derived from the Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds "Machine Set" voice are utilised throughout "Personal Jesus".

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4. "Halo"

"Halo" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Minimoog/ARP 2600 bass The origin of the bass is a combination of likely two or more unique synthesized parts, including a 'dark' velocity-sensitive synth bass layered with an additional bass part. According to Wilder, these bass parts are likely to have originated from the Minimoog and producer Flood's ARP 2600.[1]
Vocal "ahhs" The choir stabs heard during the first chorus are comprised of a series of solo vocal "ahh" samples.[footnotes 5]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Lead riff Sound Ideas - Series 1000 General Effects Library - CD #1018 Naval Boats, Ships, Motorcycles - Track #35 "SHIP, HORN" (filename "ShipHorn 1018_35") - 1983 (originally available on reel-to-reel tape, 1979)
Confirmed
The lead riff heard throughout "Halo" employs a truncated sample of a naval ship horn derived from Sound Ideas's 1983 sound effects library Series 1000 General Effects Library CD #1018 Naval Boats, Ships, Motorcycles. The library is notable for debuting as the first commercially available sound effects library of its kind on compact disc.

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Orchestral strings Gustav Mahler, Zubin Mehta - Symphony No.5 in C sharp minor - IV Adagietto: Sehr Langsam. V. Rondo - Finale: Allegro - Los Angeles Philharmonic - 1977
Confirmed
"Halo" employs orchestral phrases sampled from a 1977 performance of the fourth movement of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 Adagietto (Sehr langsam), conducted by Zubin Mehta and performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
Orchestral strings Barry Adamson - Moss Side Story - The Swinging Detective - 6 March 1989
Confirmed
An orchestral string staccato derived from Barry Adamson's 1989 instrumental "The Swinging Detective" is utilised throughout "Halo".[footnotes 6]

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Drum loop Tone Lōc - Lōc-ed After Dark - "Don't Get Close" - 1989
Confirmed
The main drum loop used throughout "Halo" is derived from the intro drum solo of "Don't Get Close" by American rapper Tone Lōc from his 1989 debut album Lōc-ed After Dark (itself derived from the intro drum solo of "Rock Candy" by Montrose for their 1973 debut album of the same name).

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Note: In this example, the drum break as heard in "Rock Candy" by Montrose is compared to its use case in Tone Lōc's "Don't Get Close", and is then compared to relevant sections of audio in "Halo".
Drum loop Montrose - "Rock Candy" - 1973
Confirmed
The main drum loop used throughout "Halo" is derived from the intro drum solo of "Don't Get Close" by American rapper Tone Lōc from his 1989 debut album Lōc-ed After Dark (itself derived from the intro drum solo of "Rock Candy" by Montrose for their 1973 debut album of the same name).

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Note: In this example, the drum break as heard in "Rock Candy" by Montrose is compared to its use case in Tone Lōc's "Don't Get Close", and is then compared to relevant sections of audio in "Halo".
Snare drum Fine Young Cannibals - "She Drives Me Crazy" - 26 December 1988
Confirmed
An edited snare drum audible during the chorus sections of "Halo" is derived from the opening moments of the Fine Young Cannibals 1988 single "She Drives Me Crazy".[footnotes 7][3] Notably, this sound is also used throughout Wilder's 1989 "Eurotech Version" remix of Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around".

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Orchestral strings Edward Elgar - Unidentified composition
Confirmed
Wilder confirmed in a 27 July 2011 interview with electricityclub.co.uk that "Halo" employs orchestral string elements sampled from an as yet unidentified piece of music composed by celebrated English composer Edward Elgar:

For the end choruses, there are some string samples which I think were derived from Elgar. One of my techniques is to find sections of classical strings and transpose / stretch these, then add my own samples, in order to formulate new and unusual arrangements. This was a case in point. The [Depeche Mode] track "Clean" utilised classical strings in a similar way.[4]

The classical recording sampled would have been recorded and released during or prior to 1989.

Rhythmic breath sample Unidentified pornographic film
Unknown
The rhythmic vocal rhythm audible in the opening moments of "Halo" is confirmed by Violator engineer Roberto Baldi as having been sampled from a pornographic film. The film is likely to have released on VHS or Betamax cassette and would have been in circulation by May 1989.

5. "Waiting For The Night"

"Waiting For The Night" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
ARP 2600 bass sequence Wilder describes the production of this bass part in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil website:

Flood and I had been listening to Tangerine Dream and decided to try and create a similar atmosphere for this track. The main sequence was put together using his [ARP 2600] and the sequencer that accompanies the synth. Due to its many velocity and filtering possibilities, this unit has a unique quality which is difficult to replicate using a modern-day sequencer triggered by MIDI. Once it has been set-up, in order for the sequence to be transposed to follow the chord structure of the song, I needed to play in each chord change from an external keyboard. A similar principal was applied to achieve the bubbling bass part which, together with the main sequence, forms the backbone of the track. The charm of the ARP sequencer stems from the slight tuning and timing variations that occur each time the part is played. This gives a sense of fluidity and continual change which seems to suit the song. [5]

Bass sequence Musician and remixer Ehron VonAllen confirmed in a YouTube analysis of his remix collaboration with Alan Wilder that Wilder employed a bass sequence originally recorded for use with "Waiting For The Night" in "Electro Blues For Bukka White".[6]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Throat singing Dmitry Damba-Darzhaa - "Край Артыы сайыр / Artyy Sayir Area" - 1969 or earlier
Confirmed
A looped chant-like sample used starting from the bridge section of "Waiting For The Night" is derived from a Tuvan throat singing recording performed by Dmitry Damba-Darzhaa, originally released on Melodii Tuvi - Throat Songs And Folk Tunes From Tuva, a 1969 collection of Tuvan music issued in the Soviet Union.[footnotes 8]

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Vocal pad Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices - SAMPLE 8
Confirmed
A vocal pad heard throughout "Waiting For The Night" utilises a vocal sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices"

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Bell-like verse chimes Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Guitar Chimes - "CHIME A4"
Confirmed
The bell-like arpeggio audible during the verse sections of "Waiting For The Night" as it was performed on the World Violation and Exotic tours is comprised of a series of edited samples derived from the "Guitar Chimes" voice featured in Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds.

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Note: In this example, a sample from the Emax II sound bank containing the musical parts performed by Alan Wilder for live use with "Waiting For The Night" is compared to the equivalent sample in the "Guitar Chimes" voice featured in Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds. The two parts are then played together, producing audible phasing artifacts when superimposed.

6. "Enjoy The Silence"

"Enjoy The Silence" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Synth bassline The synthesized bassline audible throughout "Enjoy The Silence" is produced on the Roland System 700 modular analog synthesizer.
Choir stabs The textured choral stabs heard on the first beat of every measure throughout "Enjoy The Silence" are comprised of a series of sampled choir sounds each playing individual notes of a chord. Among these sounds are two sourced samples derived from the Bulgarian State Female Vocal Choir's 1975 "Sableyalo mi Agontze (The Bleating Lamb)", the first of which is played on the first beat per measure throughout the song, the second of which is played on the first beat of every fourth chorus measure (in time with the lyric "In my arms"); a choir sound previously used for live performances of "Never Turn Your Back On Mother Earth" on the Music For The Masses tour; and a series of custom vocal "ahh" samples likely produced by sampling vocal sustains sung by Martin Gore, which are notably also used to play the choir melody heard in the song's outro.
Outro choir melody The vocal "ahhs" heard during the outro of "Enjoy The Silence" are comprised of a series of solo vocal "ahh" samples likely produced by sampling vocal sustains sung by Martin Gore.[footnotes 9] For live performances of "Enjoy The Silence", these choir elements were employed from its live debut through 2009, when it was replaced with new choir parts for use on the Tour Of The Universe and later tours (with one exception in 2013, when it returned for a live performance as part of a television promotion).
Melodic "water droplet" sequence A melancholic bell or "water droplet-like" sequence audible during the intro and middle eight sections of "Enjoy The Silence" is partly comprised of a sample derived from the opening moments of "Blasphemous Rumours". Notably, this sample would later be utilised for a melody heard during the verse sections of "Walking In My Shoes".

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Choir pad A choir pad comprised of an organ or accordion-like sound layered with a sustained vocal originally sung by Gore for use during the middle eight section of "Waiting For The Night" is played during the chorus sections of "Enjoy The Silence" as it has been performed on all live arrangements since its live debut (as well as the intro of its World Violation tour arrangement).[footnotes 10]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Choir stabs Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir - "Sableyalo mi Agontze (The Bleating Lamb)" - 1975
Confirmed
A series of choir pads which partly comprise the choir stabs audible throughout "Enjoy The Silence" are derived from the Bulgarian State Female Vocal Choir's 1975 "Sableyalo mi Agontze (The Bleating Lamb)" as performed with Bulgarian traditional singer Kalinka Valcheva. The Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir is notable for its membership, who are chosen from country villages for the beauty and fullness of their voices.

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Punchy harpsichord bass Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds: Volume 2 - Harpsichord - "B1 HARPSIC"
Confirmed
The harpsichord instrument used to accent the bassline of "Enjoy The Silence" starting from the middle eight section is partly derived from the Emulator III Universe of Sounds: Volume 2 voice "Harpsichord".[footnotes 11] The harpsichord sample is layered with a detuned copy of itself to produce a chorusing effect. A sampled bass synth part heard prominently in the opening moments of "Clean" is then layered with the harpsichord part on most notes used throughout the song. Notably, this sound is also used throughout Nitzer Ebb's "I Give To You".

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Brass melody Emax I factory library disk #ZD705: French Horn - Preset #1: "French Horns", SAMPLE 6
Confirmed
The middle eight and outro sections of "Enjoy The Silence" feature a french horn melody derived from the "French Horns" preset of Emax I factory library disk #ZD705 "French Horn".

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Chorus choir pad Emulator II factory library disk #12: Voices and Emulator II factory library disk #05: Marcato Strings
Likely
A choir pad featured in the chorus sections of "Enjoy The Silence" is likely comprised of samples derived from Emulator II factory library disk #12 "Voices" and Emulator II factory library disk #05 "Marcato Strings". The pad is prominently featured in the opening moments of the "Hands And Feet" remix of "Enjoy The Silence".

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Note: In this example, the two Emulator II voices are first played separately. They are then layered together, then played with an upper mid-frequency EQ boost to approximately match the equivalent sound in the "Hands And Feet" remix of "Enjoy The Silence", which prominently features the choir pad with added phasing effects/processing.

7. "Policy Of Truth"

"Policy Of Truth" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Main guitar rhythm The guitar rhythm prominently used during the first two verses is produced by a single note played from a guitar, which is processed and looped to provide a built-in vibrato effect. The sample is then allocated across the keyboard for playback. Though unconfirmed, a second sample is likely used to produce the faux guitar lick-esque stab with an ascending pitch bend heard on every other bar. Wilder recalled in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil website: "It's a single note sampled from a guitar and then looped and played from a keyboard. The loop is what gives it the vibrato effect."[1]
Hi-hat loops "Policy Of Truth" employs sampled hi-hat rhythms sequenced in an alternating pattern to form dynamic loops. Wilder explains the benefits of using loops over one-shot samples in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil website:

[...] No two snare beats sound the same when played by a drummer - I like that. That's why I prefer to use lots of drum loops with all the feel (and flaws) of the original performance. Most of the drum sounds on Violator were sampled (apart from obvious electro sounds) but the rhythms were still programmed. Some hi-hat patterns ("[Policy Of Truth]" for example) were played and sampled as loops and in the case of "Halo" and "Clean" it's all loops. Again, I prefer the looped parts because of the performance element.[1]

Lead melody layer The lead melody of "Policy Of Truth" is comprised of a series of layered sounds, one of which is a repurposed "ahh" vocal sample most clearly heard during the outro of "Enjoy The Silence".[footnotes 12]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Main riff Unknown Asian instrument sample library CD
Official
During a 2016 podcast with author Rob Bell, Martin Gore was asked about the origin of this sound:

Martin Gore: I think it's more organic than that. I think part of the sounds that you're talking about are samples that we... even during Violator we were doing quite a bit of sampling, so it probably came from some weird Asian instrument sample CD or a classical Asian music CD, with a [pitch] bend in it.[7][footnotes 13]

Bass guitar/piano Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds Volume 1 - Funk Bass - "Funk Bass E1", "Funk Bass G1", "Funk Bass A1", "Funk Bass C2", "Funk Bass D2", "Funk Bass F2"
Confirmed
A dark piano/bass guitar stab heard throughout the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth" is partly comprised of a series of bass guitar samples derived from the Emulator III Universe Of Sounds Volume 1 voice "Funk Bass".[footnotes 14]

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Note: In this example, the raw samples are played. The samples are then layered and finally detuned.
Looped guitar rhythm Toni Halliday - "Time Turns Around" - 1989
Confirmed
A looped guitar rhythm used during the verses of Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" is re-purposed for use within the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth".[footnotes 15][footnotes 16]

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Guitar solo Toni Halliday - "Time Turns Around" - 1989
Confirmed
Various cuts of the guitar solo from Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" are sampled and subsequently looped to form the sustained guitar pads heard during the outro of "Policy Of Truth".[footnotes 17]
Snare drum fill Tone Lōc - "Funky Cold Medina" - March 1989
Confirmed
A snare fill derived from "Funky Cold Medina", the second single from American rapper Tone Lōc's debut album Lōc-ed After Dark, is used following the first chorus and leading up to the outro of the "Policy Of Truth (7" Version)" remix.[footnotes 18]
Chorus pad Emulator II factory library disk #38: Pipe Organ - Preset #1: "Pipe Organ"
Confirmed
Emulator II factory library disk #38 "Pipe Organ" is used to play a series of ascending pipe organ pads during the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth".

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Note: In this example, chords played using the Emulator II factory disk #38 "Pipe Organ" are compared to the equivalent audio heard during the second chorus of "Policy Of Truth" derived from the center channel of the 2006 Violator 5.1 reissue.
Chorus pad Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Bowed Psaltery - "PSALTERY B3" and Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Rebel Victory - "GIANT 5"
Confirmed
The pads performed during the chorus sections of the Devotional tour arrangement of "Policy Of Truth" utilise a series of samples derived from the "Bowed Psaltery" and "Rebel Victory" voices featured in Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds.

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Note: In this example, two samples derived from Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds voices "Bowed Psaltery" and "Rebel Victory" are layered and played back via a sampling keyboard. The result is then compared to a selection of live audio from the first chorus section of "Policy Of Truth" as heard in the Devotional video release (played out of phase to more clearly expose the relevant sound).
Operatic vocal Hildegard of Bingen, Gothic Voices, Emma Kirkby, Christopher Page - A Feather on the Breath of God - "Columba aspexit" - April 1985 (recorded 14 September 1981)
Confirmed
A sample of an operatic vocal derived from a September 1981 performance of "Columba aspexit", a piece of sacred vocal music written in the 12th century by German abbess Hildegard of Bingen originally featured throughout Depeche Mode's 1986 instrumental "Christmas Island" and as a layer in the outro of "Stripped". Performed by the British vocal ensemble Gothic Voices with soprano Emma Kirkby, the sampled performance is re-purposed as a layer with one or more sounds to form a synth string pad heard throughout the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth".

8. "Blue Dress"

"Blue Dress" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Guitar-like pluck A guitar-like pluck sample is layered with a separate sound to form the dramatic chorus melody. Notably, this sample is also used as a layer of the lead melody of "Never Let Me Down Again", a melodic fill throughout "Strangelove", and as a layer for the harpsichord-like lead melody of the "Spanish Taster" mix of "To Have And To Hold".
Warm pad A warm synth-like pad sample is utilised throughout "Blue Dress".[footnotes 19]
Verse arpeggio A steel drum-like sample most prominently heard during the verses of "Stripped" is repurposed for use as a melodic arpeggio during the second verse section of "Blue Dress".

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Ambient wind-like pad Eraserhead (film) - 1977
Confirmed
One or more samples derived from the 1977 David Lynch film Eraserhead are looped to form an ambient pad heard during "Interlude No. 3" (audible around the 1:16:00 mark in the Criterion Collection release of the film). The audio is edited to first play in reverse, then forwards.

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9. "Clean"

"Clean" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes Audio
Female "ah" vocal sample "Clean" employs a female "ah" vocal part originally recorded for use throughout 1987's "I Want You Now". The part is performed in time with the snare starting from the second verse. Wilder recalled the performers responsible for this vocal part in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil website: "...I think it was a couple of girls who were hanging around the studio - thought we'd make use of them ;-)"[8]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Bass guitar Pink Floyd - "One Of These Days" - 1971
Disproven
Wilder confirmed in a Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil project site that "Clean" does not employ a sample from Pink Floyd: "I recognise the similarity but It's not a Floyd sample. It was programmed using a combination of analogue synth and sampled bass [guitar]."[9]
Looped orchestral strings Gustav Mahler - Symphony No.5 in C sharp minor - 4. Adagietto (Sehr langsam) - Chicago Symphony Orchestra - March 1970
Confirmed
"Clean" employs a looped orchestral phrase sampled from the fourth movement of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 Adagietto (Sehr langsam), conducted by Georg Solti and performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at Medinah Temple in March 1970. Other songs to feature this sample include "Memphisto", "Halo", and "My Joy".

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Orchestral string elements Unidentified classical music recording
Confirmed
"Clean" utilises two looped sections of orchestral strings during its outro, one of which is derived from a performance of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5. The other loop is presumably derived from an as yet unidentified piece of classical music written by British composer Edward Elgar. Notably, both sampled string loops as heard in the outro of "Clean" are re-purposed for use throughout the verse and chorus sections of "Halo".

B-sides, bonus tracks and remixes

"Memphisto"

"Memphisto" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Vocal "ahh" samples Unlooped versions of the samples comprising the solo vocal "ahh" melody heard in the outro of "Enjoy The Silence" are re-used to dramatic effect as a vocal element in "Memphisto".[footnotes 20]
Bass stabs A sampled synth bass stab most prominently heard throughout "Clean" is employed as a bass layer throughout "Memphisto". Notably, this part is used to similar effect throughout "Enjoy The Silence".

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Looped orchestral strings Gustav Mahler - Symphony No.5 in C sharp minor - 4. Adagietto (Sehr langsam) - Chicago Symphony Orchestra - March 1970
Confirmed
"Memphisto" employs an orchestral phrase sampled from the fourth movement of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 Adagietto (Sehr langsam), conducted by Georg Solti and performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at Medinah Temple in March 1970. Other songs to feature this sample include "Clean", "Halo", and "My Joy".
Looped orchestral strings Unidentified classical music recording
Confirmed
Both sampled string loops best heard in the outro of "Clean" are also used throughout "Memphisto", notably during the second chorus section onward. One of the two is derived from a performance of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5.

"Kaleid"

"Kaleid" - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes Audio
Tremolo guitar Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - "What Ruthy Said" - 1973
Confirmed
A rhythmic tremolo guitar element heard in the opening moments of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel's "What Ruthy Said" is sampled and used throughout "Kaleid".

Click to display/hide audio example

Distorted wah guitar fill Borghesia - "Message" - 1989
Confirmed
A guitar sound audible during the opening moments of Borghesia's "Message" is sampled for use as a fill throughout "Kaleid".[10]

Click to display/hide audio example

Synth string pad Borghesia - "Young Prisoners" - 1989
Likely
A synth string pad sound likely derived from the opening moments of Borghesia's "Young Prisoners" may be utilised throughout "Kaleid" and its various remixes.

"Sea Of Sin (Tonal Mix)"

"Sea Of Sin (Tonal Mix)" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Choir pad "Sea Of Sin (Tonal Mix)" utilises a choir pad during its verse and chorus sections. The pad is comprised of an organ or accordion-like sound layered with a sustained vocal originally sung by Martin Gore for use during the middle eight section of "Waiting For The Night".[footnotes 21]

"Sea Of Sin (Sensoria Mix)"

"Sea Of Sin" (Sensoria Mix) - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Choir pad All versions of "Sea Of Sin" utilise a "ghostly" choir pad during its verse and chorus sections. The pad is comprised of an organ or accordion-like sound layered with a sustained vocal originally sung by Martin Gore for use during the middle eight section of "Waiting For The Night".

"Happiest Girl (Pulsating Orbital Mix)"

"Happiest Girl" (Pulsating Orbital Mix) - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Engine idling/orchestral hit sample The Tornadoes - "Telstar" - 1962
Official
Credit to Daniel Barassi for this discovery.[11]

"Enjoy the Silence (The Quad: Final Mix)"

"Enjoy the Silence (The Quad: Final Mix)" - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Choir stabs Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir - "Sableyalo mi Agontze (The Bleating Lamb)" - 1975
Confirmed
A series of choir pads which partly comprise the choir stabs audible throughout "Enjoy The Silence" are derived from the Bulgarian State Female Vocal Choir's 1975 "Sableyalo mi Agontze (The Bleating Lamb)" as performed with Bulgarian traditional singer Kalinka Valcheva. The Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir is notable for its membership, who are chosen from country villages for the beauty and fullness of their voices.
Punchy harpsichord bass Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds: Volume 2 - Harpsichord - "B1 HARPSIC"
Confirmed
The harpsichord instrument used to accent the bassline of "Enjoy the Silence" as well as "Enjoy the Silence (The Quad: Final Mix)" is partly derived from the Emulator III Universe of Sounds: Volume 2 voice "Harpsichord".
Drum, synthesizer elements Ryuichi Sakamoto - Esperanto - "A Wongga Dance Song" - 1985
Confirmed
A section of audio featuring an abstract electronic drum and synthesizer pattern derived from "A Wongga Dance Song" by Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto is utilised mid-way through "Enjoy the Silence (The Quad: Final Mix)".
Multiple elements The Mothers of Invention - We're Only in It for the Money - "Are You Hung Up?" - 1968
Likely
A section of audio featuring multiple elements is likely utilised mid-way through "Enjoy the Silence (The Quad: Final Mix)".

"World In My Eyes (Dub Mix)"

"World In My Eyes" (Dub Mix) - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Snare drum Fad Gadget - Fireside Favourites - "Newsreel" - 7 November 1980
Confirmed
A manipulated snare derived from the opening moments of "Newsreel" from the 1980 Fad Gadget album Fireside Favourites is utilised throughout "World In My Eyes". Notably, this sample would also see use in the outro of "Personal Jesus". Former Depeche Mode member Alan Wilder recalled the snare drum sound of "World In My Eyes" in an undated Q&A on Shunt, the official Recoil project site: "[...] I think we made it from scratch or it could be a combination of analogue and a sample."[1]
"Clicking" verse percussion rhythm Kraftwerk - "The Man-Machine" ("Die Mensch-Maschine") - 1978
Confirmed
"World In My Eyes" utilises a timestretched "clicking" percussion rhythm throughout its verse, chorus, and outro sections that is derived from the opening moments of Kraftwerk's "The Man-Machine".
"Squelchy" snare accent Kraftwerk - "Home Computer" ("Heimcomputer") - 1981
Confirmed
"World In My Eyes" employs a manipulated sample derived from the latter half of Kraftwerk's "Home Computer".[footnotes 22]
Punchy drum fill Bryan Ferry - "Don't Stop The Dance" - 1985
Confirmed
A drum element derived from the album version of Bryan Ferry's "Don't Stop The Dance" is utilised throughout "World In My Eyes" as a drum fill.
Guitar elements Fleetwood Mac - "Black Magic Woman" - 29 March 1968
Confirmed
A guitar chord featured in the intro of Fleetwood Mac's 1968 single "Black Magic Woman" is utilised sporadically throughout "World In My Eyes". The guitar sound was performed by Fleetwood Mac founder Peter Green, who achieved its distinct shimmering effect by playing a D minor triad on the 17th fret with vibrato. A manipulated copy of the sample is played with an oscillating pitch bend layered with a separate sample (derived from Emulator II factory library disk #37: Electric Guitar) to produce a wavering verse section riff. A second copy of the sample appears on the first beat after each chorus section.[footnotes 23]
Pitch bending verse section fill Emulator II factory library disk #36: Lead Guitar
Confirmed
An electric guitar sample derived from Emulator II factory library disk #36 "Lead Guitar" is played in reverse with an oscillating pitch bend and layered with a separate sample (derived from Fleetwood Mac's "Black Magic Woman") to produce the exciting "whirl" effect that occurs during the verse sections.

"World In My Eyes (Oil Tank Mix)"

"World In My Eyes" (Oil Tank Mix) - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
N/A Kraftwerk - "Musique Non-Stop" - 1986
Unconfirmed

"Policy Of Truth (Beat Box Mix)"

"Policy Of Truth (Beat Box Mix)" - Depeche Mode
1990
Self-made samples
Sample Notes
Lead melody layer The lead melody of "Policy Of Truth" is comprised of a series of layered sounds, one of which is a repurposed "ahh" vocal sample most clearly heard during the outro of "Enjoy The Silence".[footnotes 24]

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Snare drum fill Tone Lōc - "Funky Cold Medina" - March 1989
Confirmed
A snare fill derived from "Funky Cold Medina", the second single from American rapper Tone Lōc's debut album Lōc-ed After Dark, is utilised throughout the "(7" Version)", "Beat Box Mix", "Capitol Mix", and "Pavlov's Dub" remixes of "Policy Of Truth".
Looped guitar rhythm Toni Halliday - "Time Turns Around" - 1989
Confirmed
A looped guitar rhythm used during the verses of Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" is re-purposed for use during the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth".[footnotes 25][footnotes 26]
Guitar solo Toni Halliday - "Time Turns Around" - 1989
Confirmed
Various cuts of the guitar solo from Toni Halliday's "Time Turns Around" are sampled and subsequently looped to form the sustained guitar pads heard during the outro of "Policy Of Truth".[footnotes 27]
Synth string Akai S1000/S1100 Sound Library - Violin Ensemble SL1093 - SLOW+CHORUS - "E5 VL-E"
Likely
A processed sample of a violin derived from the "SLOW+CHORUS" program featured on Akai S1000/S1000 sound library disk "Violin Ensemble SL1093" is likely utilised for the duration of the refrain sections of "Policy Of Truth".
Chorus pad Emulator II factory library disk #38: Pipe Organ - Preset #1: "Pipe Organ"
Confirmed
Emulator II factory library disk #38 "Pipe Organ" is used to play a series of ascending pipe organ pads during the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth".
Chorus pad Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Bowed Psaltery - "PSALTERY B3" and Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Rebel Victory - "GIANT 5"
Confirmed
The pads performed during the chorus sections of the Devotional tour arrangement of "Policy Of Truth" utilise a series of samples derived from the "Bowed Psaltery" and "Rebel Victory" voices featured in Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds.

"Policy Of Truth (Capitol Mix)"

"Policy Of Truth (Capitol Mix)" - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Drum elements The Cecil Holmes Soulful Sounds - The Black Motion Picture Experience - "Also Sprach Zarathrustra (2001)" - 1973
Confirmed
A manipulated drum fill derived from the intro of "Also Sprach Zarathrustra (2001)" by The Cecil Holmes Soulful Sounds is utilised throughout the "Capitol" remix of "Policy Of Truth".
Conga drum rhythm William DeVaughn - "Be Thankful for What You Got" (single edit) - March 1974[12]
Confirmed
A manipulated conga drum rhythm performed by musician Larry Washington for American R&B/soul singer William DeVaughn's 1974 "Be Thankful for What You Got" is utilised throughout the "Pavlov's Dub" and "Capitol" remixes of "Policy Of Truth".
Snare drum fill Tone Lōc - "Funky Cold Medina" - March 1989
Confirmed
A snare fill derived from "Funky Cold Medina", the second single from American rapper Tone Lōc's debut album Lōc-ed After Dark, is utilised throughout the "(7" Version)", "Beat Box Mix", "Capitol Mix", and "Pavlov's Dub" remixes of "Policy Of Truth".
Bass guitar/piano Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds Volume 1 - Funk Bass - "Funk Bass E1", "Funk Bass G1", "Funk Bass A1", "Funk Bass C2", "Funk Bass D2", "Funk Bass F2"
Confirmed
A dark piano/bass guitar stab heard throughout the chorus sections of "Policy Of Truth" is partly comprised of a series of bass guitar samples derived from the Emulator III Universe Of Sounds Volume 1 voice "Funk Bass".[footnotes 28]
Chorus pad Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Bowed Psaltery - "PSALTERY B3" and Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds - Rebel Victory - "GIANT 5"
Confirmed
The pads performed during the chorus sections of the Devotional tour arrangement of "Policy Of Truth" utilise a series of samples derived from the "Bowed Psaltery" and "Rebel Victory" voices featured in Emulator III OMI Universe of Sounds.
Richard Nixon vocal (spoken) The "Checkers speech", Richard M. Nixon speech broadcast, 1952
Confirmed
Synth string Akai S1000/S1100 Sound Library - Violin Ensemble SL1093 - SLOW+CHORUS - "E5 VL-E"
Likely
A processed sample of a violin derived from the "SLOW+CHORUS" program featured on Akai S1000/S1000 sound library disk "Violin Ensemble SL1093" is likely utilised for the duration of the refrain sections of "Policy Of Truth".

"Policy Of Truth (Pavlov's Dub)"

"Policy Of Truth" (Pavlov's Dub) - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
Snare drum fill Tone Lōc - "Funky Cold Medina" - March 1989
Confirmed
A snare fill derived from "Funky Cold Medina", the second single from American rapper Tone Lōc's debut album Lōc-ed After Dark, is utilised throughout the "(7" Version)", "Beat Box Mix", "Capitol Mix", and "Pavlov's Dub" remixes of "Policy Of Truth".
"I must not conceal from you tonight...the truth as I see it" Winston Churchill vocal (spoken) MIT Mid-Century Convocation - Winston Churchill speech at Mass. Institute of Technology, Thursday, March 31, 1949
Confirmed
Conga drum rhythm William DeVaughn - "Be Thankful for What You Got" (single edit) - March 1974[12]
Confirmed
A manipulated conga drum rhythm performed by musician Larry Washington for American R&B/soul singer William DeVaughn's 1974 "Be Thankful for What You Got" is utilised throughout the "Pavlov's Dub" and "Capitol" remixes of "Policy Of Truth".

"Policy Of Truth (Transcentral Mix)"

"Policy Of Truth (Trancentral Mix)" - Depeche Mode
1990

Sourced samples
Sample Source Status Notes
"I'm not a politician, I'm a businessman" Robert Hoskins vocal (spoken) The Long Good Friday (film) - 1980
Confirmed
Richard Nixon vocal (spoken) The "Checkers speech", Richard M. Nixon speech broadcast, 1952
Confirmed


References

Notes

  1. Other songs to feature these vocal elements include "Enjoy The Silence", "Policy Of Truth" (as a layer mixed in with the lead melody), "Memphisto", as well as the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  2. Credit to Christopher Baird for this discovery.
  3. Credit to "Heiko Brune" for this discovery.
  4. Originally available on reel-to-reel tape, 1979.
  5. Other songs to feature these vocal elements include "Enjoy The Silence","World In My Eyes", "Policy Of Truth" (as a layer mixed in with the lead melody), "Memphisto", and the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  6. Notably, Depeche Mode and frequent Recoil collaborator Paul Kendall performed mixing, engineering, and general production assistance for Adamson's 1989 debut concept album Moss Side Story. A sample from another song featured on the same album, "The Man with the Golden Arm", would be utilised on the 1991 Nitzer Ebb album Ebbhead as produced by Alan Wilder.
  7. Prior to any editing applied post-sampling, the original snare's characteristic "pop" effect was achieved by recording the snare separately, then placing a speaker on top of the snare drum and a microphone below it, with the original recording played through the speaker and re-recorded.
  8. The recording was included in a 2016 compilation album АНТОЛОГИЯ НАРОДНОЙ МУЗЫКИ: ТУВИНСКАЯ МУЗЫКА / Anthology Of Folk Music: Tuvan Music, which features reissued recordings of Tuvan music performed between 1958 and 1984.
  9. Other songs to feature these vocal elements include "Memphisto", "World In My Eyes", "Policy Of Truth" (as a layer mixed in with the lead melody), "Halo", "Sibeling" (layered quietly as a melodic element), and the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  10. Notably, this sound is also utilised for the main choir pad heard throughout all versions of "Sea Of Sin", as well as a chorus pad layered with several of the vocal "ahh" sounds most obviously heard in the outro of "Enjoy The Silence" for use during the chorus sections of "Halo" as it has been performed on all live arrangements since its live debut (with one exception in the 2013-2014 Delta Machine tour).
  11. Fan credit: Richard López.
  12. Other songs to feature these vocal elements include "Memphisto", "World In My Eyes", "Halo", and the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  13. The sample library or classical release in question that was sampled for the main riff components would have been in circulation by 1989.
  14. Fan credit: Richard López.
  15. Credit to Home user 'Alex' for this discovery.
  16. The parts were likely derived from the stems utilised by Wilder in the production of the "Eurotech Version" remix he produced for the March 1989 Time Turns Around - Very Special Version promotional release.
  17. The parts were likely derived from the stems utilised by Wilder in the production of the "Eurotech Version" remix he produced for the March 1989 Time Turns Around - Very Special Version promotional release.
  18. Notably, this snare fill is also used in the "Beat Box Mix", "Capitol Mix", and "Pavlov's Dub" remixes of "Policy Of Truth", as well as the live arrangement of "Policy Of Truth" as it was performed on the World Violation tour.
  19. Notably, this sample is also performed during the third verse section of "World In My Eyes" as it was performed on the Devotional tour. It is also used as a layer of the six note melody performed sporadically throughout the instrumental outro of "Personal Jesus" in all live concert performances since its live debut.
  20. Other notable uses of these vocal elements include the choir stabs audible during the first chorus of "Halo", a quietly-mixed melody in the outro of "World In My Eyes", and the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  21. Notably, this sound is also played live during the chorus sections of "Enjoy The Silence" as it has been performed on all live arrangements since its live debut (as well as the intro of its World Violation tour arrangement). This sound is also layered with several of the vocal "ahh" sounds most famously used during the outro of "Enjoy The Silence" for use during the chorus sections of "Halo" as it has been performed on all live arrangements since its live debut (with one exception in the 2013-2014 Delta Machine tour).
  22. Credit to "Heiko Brune" for this discovery.
  23. Credit to Christopher Baird for this discovery.
  24. Other songs to feature these vocal elements include "Memphisto", "World In My Eyes", "Halo", and the sustained choir chords heard during the second verse of "In Your Room" as it was performed on the Devotional, Exotic, and Global Spirit tours.
  25. Credit to Home user 'Alex' for this discovery.
  26. The parts were likely derived from the stems utilised by Wilder in the production of the "Eurotech Version" remix he produced for the March 1989 Time Turns Around - Very Special Version promotional release.
  27. The parts were likely derived from the stems utilised by Wilder in the production of the "Eurotech Version" remix he produced for the March 1989 Time Turns Around - Very Special Version promotional release.
  28. Fan credit: Richard López.